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Why this blog?


Last Saturday I posted a factual account of an incident that I believed was unethical treatment by a commander against personnel I was responsible for.

I removed the blog because I was concerned the information would pile onto someone who could be already stressed the their limits. I  wasn't willing to kick someone while they are down. I might re-post it in the future, but some names might be removed or changed. I haven't decided yet.

However, that decision led me to a greater discussion with my significant other about what exactly is the purpose of this blog.

So let me start by explaining what it is, and why I am doing it. I'd also like to address things I don't want this blog to be. More on that later.

This blog is a weekly [so far, I might run out of stories] event where I tell a story from my career. I try to explain it as objectively as possible but I might include some humor or take a shot and people here or there [assume I'll take a shot at Fraley whenever I can]. In these stories I will explain my reasoning or moral dilemma and what I did to resolve it.

My hope is that decisions I've made that were difficult will provide someone else a frame of reference if they find themselves in a similar situation. It may be 'he really screwed that up' or 'he should've handled it more low-key', or it could be 'I understand why this is important, and I've seen what will happen if I stick to my guns.'

The reason these stories couldn't be told until now is that I lacked the freedom to tell them candidly. Being under the scrutiny of the military precluded me from being forthright.

My career has been rocky over the years. But never worse than my last 3 spent at Holloman. I imagine many wondered what happened? I see this blog as a chance to fill-in the gaps for those that saw my chaotic duty title changes, especially in the last 2 years.

It's not going to be all doom and gloom or shit talking. I plan to write about the positive influences I've experienced.

If anything this will give my kids an idea of what I was going through when I was at work or in another state. A poor man's shitty memoir as it were.

What I don't want is a virtue signalling ego stroke. It's difficult to articulate how I came to decisions in these moral scenarios without virtue signalling. The best I can do is objectively explain why I chose a path and hope I'm not too full of myself.

I've allowed anonymous comments on all of my blogs. If you would like to discuss or counter any points I've made in the blog absolutely feel free. I've never been afraid of a good discussion.


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