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Smoke doesn't always mean fire Part I

This is the first post in the long final story that I will tell from my career in the Air Force. All the other stories up to this point were told so you, the reader, could understand how I was guided in my career to be prepared for the moment in this story.

The main character in this story has had his name changed to protect his identity as he is still active duty. He has given me permission [read:excitedly asked when I will write this] to tell this story.

In the summer of 2015 I was the specialist section chief in the 311th AMU at Holloman AFB. We had a few new arrivals to the section. Most of them were new avionics airmen, which we desperately needed. However, we did have an E&E SrA arrive who had a line number for Staff Sergeant. His name was SrA Tyler Perkie. He was respectful, polite and hard working. It was rare to not see him covered in aircraft filth, which is quite the compliment for the working sector of the Air Force. He was tireless at the job and his positive attitud…

Sierra Hotel Echo Podcast




For this week's blog I sat down with the Sierra Hotel Echo podcast to discuss my career, experiences and why I decided to write this blog.

I also expanded on the SrA Rodgers story from a few weeks ago.

You can find a link to the blog here, or find Sierra Hotel Echo Episode 10 on your preferred podcast medium.

Let me know what you think in the comments!

Comments

  1. I really enjoyed listening to the podcast. It helped me to see the bigger picture even more and how people in higher leadership positions make decisions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Shi! What did you think of the female mentor discussion at the end? Do you feel you need a female mentor specifically to succeed?

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