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Smoke doesn't always mean fire Part I

Sierra Hotel Echo Podcast




For this week's blog I sat down with the Sierra Hotel Echo podcast to discuss my career, experiences and why I decided to write this blog.

I also expanded on the SrA Rodgers story from a few weeks ago.

You can find a link to the blog here, or find Sierra Hotel Echo Episode 10 on your preferred podcast medium.

Let me know what you think in the comments!

Comments

  1. I really enjoyed listening to the podcast. It helped me to see the bigger picture even more and how people in higher leadership positions make decisions.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Shi! What did you think of the female mentor discussion at the end? Do you feel you need a female mentor specifically to succeed?

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